A People and a Nation

A People and a Nation
Author: Jennifer Adese,Chris Andersen
Pages: 252
ISBN: 9780774865098
Available:
Release: 2021-02-15
Editor: UBC Press
Language: en

Resume:

In A People and a Nation, the authors, most of whom are Métis, offer readers a set of lenses through which to consider the complexity of historical and contemporary Métis nationhood and peoplehood. The field of Métis Studies has been afflicted by a longstanding tendency to situate Métis within deeply racialized contexts, and/or by an overwhelming focus on the nineteenth century. This volume challenges the pervasive racialization of Métis studies with multidisciplinary chapters on identity, history, politics, literature, spirituality, religion, and kinship networks, reorienting the conversation toward Métis experiences today.

A People and a Nation Volume I to 1877

A People and a Nation  Volume I  to 1877
Author: Mary Beth Norton,Jane Kamensky,Carol Sheriff,David W. Blight,Howard Chudacoff
Pages: 544
ISBN: 1285430824
Available:
Release: 2014-01-01
Editor: Cengage Learning
Language: en

Resume:

A PEOPLE AND A NATION is a best-selling text offering a spirited narrative that tells the stories of all people in the United States. The authors' attention to race and racial identity and their inclusion of everyday people and popular culture brings history to life, engaging readers and encouraging them to imagine what life was really like in the past. In the tenth edition, the number of chapters has been reduced from 33 to 29, making the text easier to assign in a typical semester. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

A People and a Nation

A People and a Nation
Author: David M. Katzman,Mary Beth Norton,Paul D. Escott,Howard P. Chundacoff,Thomas G. Paterson,William M. Tuttle, Jr.,William J. Brophy
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0395974798
Available:
Release: 1999-01-01
Editor: Houghton Mifflin College Division
Language: en

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A People and a Nation

A People and a Nation
Author: Mary Beth Norton,David W. Blight,David M. Katzman
Pages: 611
ISBN: 0618214682
Available:
Release: 2002-07-01
Editor: Houghton Mifflin College Division
Language: en

Resume:

A People and a Nation, Brief Sixth Edition, weaves the rich fabric of social history into a political, diplomatic, and economic narrative to tell "the whole story" of American history. The thoughtful discussion of the lives of everyday people, cultural diversity, work, and popular culture brings America's history to life. New content in this edition includes coverage of slavery in the colonial period, the development of race theory and the social construction of racial identity, new "integration" of the South into the national picture, and enhanced discussion of the U.S. in the world.

M tis

M  tis
Author: Chris Andersen
Pages: 285
ISBN: 9780774827232
Available:
Release: 2014-04-21
Editor: UBC Press
Language: en

Resume:

Ask any Canadian what "Métis" means, and they will likely say "mixed race." Canadians consider Métis mixed in ways that other Indigenous people are not, and the census and courts have premised their recognition of Métis status on this race-based understanding. Andersen argues that Canada got it wrong. From its roots deep in the colonial past, the idea of Métis as mixed has slowly pervaded the Canadian consciousness until it settled in the realm of common sense. In the process, "Métis" has become a racial category rather than the identity of an Indigenous people with a shared sense of history and culture.

Cengage Advantage Books a People and a Nation

Cengage Advantage Books  a People and a Nation
Author: Mary Beth Norton,Jane Kamensky,Howard Chudacoff,Carol Sheriff,David W. Blight
Pages: 498
ISBN: 128542588X
Available:
Release: 2014-02-10
Editor: Cengage Advantage Books
Language: en

Resume:

Developed to meet the demand for a low-cost, high-quality history book, this economically priced version of A PEOPLE AND A NATION, Tenth Edition, offers readers the complete narrative while limiting the number of features, photos, and maps. All volumes feature a paperback, two-color format that appeals to those seeking a comprehensive, trade-sized history book. A PEOPLE AND A NATION is a best-selling text offering a spirited narrative that tells the stories of all people in the United States. The authors' attention to race and racial identity and their inclusion of everyday people and popular culture brings history to life, engaging readers and encouraging them to imagine what life was really like in the past.

Pemmican Eaters The

Pemmican Eaters  The
Author: Marilyn Dumont
Pages: 96
ISBN: 9781770907225
Available:
Release: 2015-04-01
Editor: ECW Press
Language: en

Resume:

A picture of the Riel Resistance from one of Canada's preeminent MéŽtis poets With a title derived from John A. Macdonald's moniker for the MéŽtis, The Pemmican Eaters explores Marilyn Dumont's sense of history as the dynamic present. Combining free verse and metered poems, her latest collection aims to recreate a palpable sense of the Riel Resistance period and evoke the geographical, linguistic/cultural, and political situation of Batoche during this time through the eyes of those who experienced the battles, as well as through the eyes of Gabriel and Madeleine Dumont and Louis Riel. Included in this collection are poems about the bison, seed beadwork, and the Red River Cart, and some poems employ elements of the Michif language, which, along with French and Cree, was spoken by Dumont's ancestors. In Dumont's The Pemmican Eaters, a multiplicity of identities is a strengthening rather than a weakening or diluting force in culture.

What Is a Nation and Other Political Writings

What Is a Nation  and Other Political Writings
Author: Ernest Renan
Pages: 329
ISBN: 9780231547147
Available:
Release: 2018-08-28
Editor: Columbia University Press
Language: en

Resume:

Ernest Renan was one of the leading lights of the Parisian intellectual scene in the second half of the nineteenth century. A philologist, historian, and biblical scholar, he was a prominent voice of French liberalism and secularism. Today most familiar in the English-speaking world for his 1882 lecture “What Is a Nation?” and its definition of a nation as an “everyday plebiscite,” Renan was a major figure in the debates surrounding the Franco-Prussian War, the Paris Commune, and the birth of the Third Republic and had a profound influence on thinkers across the political spectrum who grappled with the problem of authority and social organization in the new world wrought by the forces of modernization. What Is a Nation? and Other Political Writings is the first English-language anthology of Renan’s political thought. Offering a broad selection of Renan’s writings from several periods of his public life, most previously untranslated, it restores Renan to his place as one of France’s major liberal thinkers and gives vital critical context to his views on nationalism. The anthology illuminates the characteristics that distinguished nineteenth-century French liberalism from its English and American counterparts as well as the more controversial parts of Renan’s legacy, including his analysis of colonial expansion, his views on Islam and Judaism, and the role of race in his thought. The volume contains a critical introduction to Renan’s life and work as well as detailed annotations that assist in recovering the wealth and complexity of his thought.

A People a Nation

A People   a Nation
Author: Mary Beth Norton,Jane Kamensky,Carol Sheriff,David W. Blight,Howard Chudacoff
Pages: 1009
ISBN: 1285425871
Available:
Release: 2014-02-10
Editor: Cengage Advantage Books
Language: en

Resume:

Developed to meet the demand for a low-cost, high-quality history book, this economically priced version of A PEOPLE AND A NATION, Tenth Edition, offers readers the complete narrative while limiting the number of features, photos, and maps. All volumes feature a paperback, two-color format that appeals to those seeking a comprehensive, trade-sized history book. A PEOPLE AND A NATION is a best-selling text offering a spirited narrative that tells the stories of all people in the United States. The authors' attention to race and racial identity and their inclusion of everyday people and popular culture brings history to life, engaging readers and encouraging them to imagine what life was really like in the past.

A People and a Nation

A People and a Nation
Author: Norton
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0618424768
Available:
Release: 2003-05-01
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Resume:

A Colony in a Nation

A Colony in a Nation
Author: Chris Hayes
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9780393254235
Available:
Release: 2017-03-21
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
Language: en

Resume:

New York Times Bestseller New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice "An essential and groundbreaking text in the effort to understand how American criminal justice went so badly awry." —Ta-Nehisi Coates, author of Between the World and Me In A Colony in a Nation, New York Times best-selling author and Emmy Award–winning news anchor Chris Hayes upends the national conversation on policing and democracy. Drawing on wide-ranging historical, social, and political analysis, as well as deeply personal experiences with law enforcement, Hayes contends that our country has fractured in two: the Colony and the Nation. In the Nation, the law is venerated. In the Colony, fear and order undermine civil rights. With great empathy, Hayes seeks to understand this systemic divide, examining its ties to racial inequality, the omnipresent threat of guns, and the dangerous and unfortunate results of choices made by fear.

Song of a Nation

Song of a Nation
Author: Robert Harris
Pages: 272
ISBN: 9780771050947
Available:
Release: 2019-06-04
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Resume:

The greatest story never told, this formidable and gorgeously written biography documents the amazing and controversial short life of Calixa Lavallée--the composer of "O Canada"--and the tumult of 19th-century North America. He was a composer, a performer, an entrepreneur, and an educator; played pop and classical music; and appeared in his quasi-colonial society, tragically, just ahead of his time. Calixa Lavallee, the French Canadian composer of "O Canada," has a compelling, almost unbelievable personal story. He left home at 12 and worked as a blackface minstrel, travelling throughout the United States for more than a decade; he fought and was injured in the American Civil War in perhaps the most important battle of that war, at Antietam Creek; performed for President Lincoln several times; produced the first opera in Quebec and wrote two of his own; became a leading figure in American music education, representing American music in London; journeyed to Paris to study for two years; tried and failed to create a Quebec national conservatory. And he wrote our national anthem. But Lavallée also represents all the contradictions and confusions of Canadian identity as our country came together in the last half of the nineteenth century. To understand "O Canada," and to understand the man who wrote it, is to return to the Canada of the mid-nineteenth century, a Canada just forming as a nation, bringing together ancient racial hatreds and novel political possibilities, as culture faced culture, religion faced religion, economy faced economy. Calixa Lavallée is the most famous Canadian you have never heard of, living a life and ultimately composing a song that stands the test of time.

A Nation under Our Feet

A Nation under Our Feet
Author: Steven Hahn
Pages: 624
ISBN: 9780674254282
Available:
Release: 2005-04-30
Editor: Harvard University Press
Language: en

Resume:

This is the epic story of how African-Americans, in the six decades following slavery, transformed themselves into a political people—an embryonic black nation. As Steven Hahn demonstrates, rural African-Americans were central political actors in the great events of disunion, emancipation, and nation-building. At the same time, Hahn asks us to think in more expansive ways about the nature and boundaries of politics and political practice. Emphasizing the importance of kinship, labor, and networks of communication, A Nation under Our Feet explores the political relations and sensibilities that developed under slavery and shows how they set the stage for grassroots mobilization. Hahn introduces us to local leaders, and shows how political communities were built, defended, and rebuilt. He also identifies the quest for self-governance as an essential goal of black politics across the rural South, from contests for local power during Reconstruction, to emigrationism, biracial electoral alliances, social separatism, and, eventually, migration. Hahn suggests that Garveyism and other popular forms of black nationalism absorbed and elaborated these earlier struggles, thus linking the first generation of migrants to the urban North with those who remained in the South. He offers a new framework—looking out from slavery—to understand twentieth-century forms of black political consciousness as well as emerging battles for civil rights. It is a powerful story, told here for the first time, and one that presents both an inspiring and a troubling perspective on American democracy.

A People and A Nation Volume 1 Brief 7th Edition Plus Atlas Plus Document Sets Volume 1

A People and A Nation Volume 1 Brief 7th Edition Plus Atlas Plus Document Sets Volume 1
Author: Mary Beth Norton
Pages: 329
ISBN: 0618836284
Available:
Release: 2006-05-01
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

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A Nation of Nations

A Nation of Nations
Author: Tom Gjelten
Pages: 424
ISBN: 9781476743868
Available:
Release: 2016-10-25
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Language: en

Resume:

"The dramatic and compelling story of the transformation of America during the last fifty years, told through a handful of families in one suburban county in Virginia that has been utterly changed by recent immigration. In the fifty years since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, the foreign-born population of the United States has tripled. Significantly, these immigrants are not coming from Europe, as was the case before 1965, but from all corners of the globe. Today non-European immigration is ninety percent of the total immigration to the US. Americans today are vastly more diverse than ever. They look different, speak different languages, practice different religions, eat different foods, and enjoy different cultures. In 1950, Fairfax County, Virginia, was ninety percent white, ten percent African-American, with a little more than one hundred families who were 'other.' Currently the African-American percentage of the population is about the same, but the Anglo white population is less than fifty percent, and there are families of Asian, African, Middle Eastern, and Latin American origin living all over the county. A Nation of Nations follows the lives of a few immigrants to Fairfax County over recent decades as they gradually 'Americanize.' Hailing from Korea, Bolivia, and Libya, these families have stories that illustrate common immigrant themes: friction between minorities, economic competition and entrepreneurship, and racial and cultural stereotyping. It's been half a century since the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act changed the landscape of America, and no book has assessed the impact or importance of this law as this one does, with its brilliant combination of personal stories and larger demographic and political issues."--Publisher information.

A People s History of the United States

A People s History of the United States
Author: Howard Zinn
Pages: 675
ISBN:
Available:
Release: 1996
Editor: Aristotext
Language: en

Resume:

In this Second Edition of this radical social history of America from Columbus to the present, Howard Zinn includes substantial coverage of the Carter, Reagan and Bush years and an Afterword on the Clinton presidency. Its commitment and vigorous style mean it will be compelling reading for under-graduate and post-graduate students and scholars in American social history and American studies, as well as the general reader.

A Nation Without Borders

A Nation Without Borders
Author: Steven Hahn
Pages: 608
ISBN: 9780735221208
Available:
Release: 2016-11-01
Editor: Penguin
Language: en

Resume:

A Pulitzer Prize–winning historian’s "breathtakingly original" (Junot Diaz) reinterpretation of the eight decades surrounding the Civil War. "Capatious [and] buzzing with ideas." --The Boston Globe Volume 3 in the Penguin History of the United States, edited by Eric Foner In this ambitious story of American imperial conquest and capitalist development, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian Steven Hahn takes on the conventional histories of the nineteenth century and offers a perspective that promises to be as enduring as it is controversial. It begins and ends in Mexico and, throughout, is internationalist in orientation. It challenges the political narrative of “sectionalism,” emphasizing the national footing of slavery and the struggle between the northeast and Mississippi Valley for continental supremacy. It places the Civil War in the context of many domestic rebellions against state authority, including those of Native Americans. It fully incorporates the trans-Mississippi west, suggesting the importance of the Pacific to the imperial vision of political leaders and of the west as a proving ground for later imperial projects overseas. It reconfigures the history of capitalism, insisting on the centrality of state formation and slave emancipation to its consolidation. And it identifies a sweeping era of “reconstructions” in the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that simultaneously laid the foundations for corporate liberalism and social democracy. The era from 1830 to 1910 witnessed massive transformations in how people lived, worked, thought about themselves, and struggled to thrive. It also witnessed the birth of economic and political institutions that still shape our world. From an agricultural society with a weak central government, the United States became an urban and industrial society in which government assumed a greater and greater role in the framing of social and economic life. As the book ends, the United States, now a global economic and political power, encounters massive warfare between imperial powers in Europe and a massive revolution on its southern border―the remarkable Mexican Revolution―which together brought the nineteenth century to a close while marking the important themes of the twentieth.

Not A Nation of Immigrants

Not  A Nation of Immigrants
Author: Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
Pages: 400
ISBN: 9780807036297
Available:
Release: 2021-08-24
Editor: Beacon Press
Language: en

Resume:

Debunks the pervasive and self-congratulatory myth that our country is proudly founded by and for immigrants, and urges readers to embrace a more complex and honest history of the United States Whether in political debates or discussions about immigration around the kitchen table, many Americans, regardless of party affiliation, will say proudly that we are a nation of immigrants. In this bold new book, historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz asserts this ideology is harmful and dishonest because it serves to mask and diminish the US’s history of settler colonialism, genocide, white supremacy, slavery, and structural inequality, all of which we still grapple with today. She explains that the idea that we are living in a land of opportunity—founded and built by immigrants—was a convenient response by the ruling class and its brain trust to the 1960s demands for decolonialization, justice, reparations, and social equality. Moreover, Dunbar-Ortiz charges that this feel good—but inaccurate—story promotes a benign narrative of progress, obscuring that the country was founded in violence as a settler state, and imperialist since its inception. While some of us are immigrants or descendants of immigrants, others are descendants of white settlers who arrived as colonizers to displace those who were here since time immemorial, and still others are descendants of those who were kidnapped and forced here against their will. This paradigm shifting new book from the highly acclaimed author of An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States charges that we need to stop believing and perpetuating this simplistic and a historical idea and embrace the real (and often horrific) history of the United States.

Jews and Power

Jews and Power
Author: Ruth R. Wisse
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9780805211740
Available:
Release: 2020-02-04
Editor: JEWISH ENCOUNTERS SERIES
Language: en

Resume:

Part of the Jewish Encounter series Taking in everything from the Kingdom of David to the Oslo Accords, Ruth Wisse offers a radical new way to think about the Jewish relationship to power. Traditional Jews believed that upholding the covenant with God constituted a treaty with the most powerful force in the universe; this later transformed itself into a belief that, unburdened by a military, Jews could pursue their religious mission on a purely moral plain. Wisse, an eminent professor of comparative literature at Harvard, demonstrates how Jewish political weakness both increased Jewish vulnerability to scapegoating and violence, and unwittingly goaded power-seeking nations to cast Jews as perpetual targets. Although she sees hope in the State of Israel, Wisse questions the way the strategies of the Diaspora continue to drive the Jewish state, echoing Abba Eban's observation that Israel was the only nation to win a war and then sue for peace. And then she draws a persuasive parallel to the United States today, as it struggles to figure out how a liberal democracy can face off against enemies who view Western morality as weakness. This deeply provocative book is sure to stir debate both inside and outside the Jewish world. Wisse's narrative offers a compelling argument that is rich with history and bristling with contemporary urgency.

To Kill a Nation

To Kill a Nation
Author: Michael Parenti
Pages: 246
ISBN: 1859843662
Available:
Release: 2002
Editor: Verso
Language: en

Resume:

Challenges mainstream media coverage of the war, uncovering hidden agendas behind Western rhetoric.