American Holocaust

American Holocaust
Author: David E. Stannard
Pages: 358
ISBN: 9780195085570
Available:
Release: 1993-11-18
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Resume:

This controversial treatise focuses on the social and cultural issues involved in the invasion of the Americas by European nations. It describes the suppression or extermination of native cultures, and focuses on the cultural and ideological principles behind the colonization efforts.

The Mismeasure of Desire

The Mismeasure of Desire
Author: David E. Stannard
Pages: 416
ISBN: 0199838984
Available:
Release: 1993-11-18
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Resume:

For four hundred years--from the first Spanish assaults against the Arawak people of Hispaniola in the 1490s to the U.S. Army's massacre of Sioux Indians at Wounded Knee in the 1890s--the indigenous inhabitants of North and South America endured an unending firestorm of violence. During that time the native population of the Western Hemisphere declined by as many as 100 million people. Indeed, as historian David E. Stannard argues in this stunning new book, the European and white American destruction of the native peoples of the Americas was the most massive act of genocide in the history of the world. Stannard begins with a portrait of the enormous richness and diversity of life in the Americas prior to Columbus's fateful voyage in 1492. He then follows the path of genocide from the Indies to Mexico and Central and South America, then north to Florida, Virginia, and New England, and finally out across the Great Plains and Southwest to California and the North Pacific Coast. Stannard reveals that wherever Europeans or white Americans went, the native people were caught between imported plagues and barbarous atrocities, typically resulting in the annihilation of 95 percent of their populations. What kind of people, he asks, do such horrendous things to others? His highly provocative answer: Christians. Digging deeply into ancient European and Christian attitudes toward sex, race, and war, he finds the cultural ground well prepared by the end of the Middle Ages for the centuries-long genocide campaign that Europeans and their descendants launched--and in places continue to wage--against the New World's original inhabitants. Advancing a thesis that is sure to create much controversy, Stannard contends that the perpetrators of the American Holocaust drew on the same ideological wellspring as did the later architects of the Nazi Holocaust. It is an ideology that remains dangerously alive today, he adds, and one that in recent years has surfaced in American justifications for large-scale military intervention in Southeast Asia and the Middle East. At once sweeping in scope and meticulously detailed, American Holocaust is a work of impassioned scholarship that is certain to ignite intense historical and moral debate.

American Holocaust

American Holocaust
Author: David E. Stannard
Pages: 358
ISBN: 0195085574
Available:
Release: 1993-11-18
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Resume:

Arguing that the European and white American destruction of the native American people was the most massive act of genocide in the history of the world, Stannard attempts to set the records straight on what befell American Indians over the last five centuries.

The Holocaust in American Life

The Holocaust in American Life
Author: Peter Novick
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9780547349619
Available:
Release: 2000-09-20
Editor: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Language: en

Resume:

Prize-winning historian Peter Novick illuminates the reasons Americans ignored the Holocaust for so long -- how dwelling on German crimes interfered with Cold War mobilization; how American Jews, not wanting to be thought of as victims, avoided the subject. He explores in absorbing detail the decisions that later moved the Holocaust to the center of American life: Jewish leaders invoking its memory to muster support for Israel and to come out on top in a sordid competition over what group had suffered most; politicians using it to score points with Jewish voters. With insight and sensitivity, Novick raises searching questions about these developments. Have American Jews, by making the Holocaust the emblematic Jewish experience, given Hitler a posthumous victory, tacitly endorsing his definition of Jews as despised pariahs? Does the Holocaust really teach useful lessons and sensitize us to atrocities, or, by making the Holocaust the measure, does it make lesser crimes seem "not so bad"? What are we to make of the fact that while Americans spend hundreds of millions of dollars for museums recording a European crime, there is no museum of American slavery?

Witness Through the Imagination

Witness Through the Imagination
Author: S. Lilian Kremer,Lilian Kremer
Pages: 400
ISBN: 9780814343944
Available:
Release: 2018-02-05
Editor: Wayne State University Press
Language: en

Resume:

A critical reading of themes and stylistic strategies of major American Holocaust fiction to determine its capacity to render the prelude, progress, and aftermath of the Holocaust.

Holocaust

Holocaust
Author: Deborah E. Lipstadt
Pages: 220
ISBN: 9780813564784
Available:
Release: 2016-07-21
Editor: Rutgers University Press
Language: en

Resume:

Immediately after World War II, there was little discussion of the Holocaust, but today the word has grown into a potent political and moral symbol, recognized by all. In Holocaust: An American Understanding, renowned historian Deborah E. Lipstadt explores this striking evolution in Holocaust consciousness, revealing how a broad array of Americans—from students in middle schools to presidents of the United States—tried to make sense of this inexplicable disaster, and how they came to use the Holocaust as a lens to interpret their own history. Lipstadt weaves a powerful narrative that touches on events as varied as the civil rights movement, Vietnam, Stonewall, and the women’s movement, as well as controversies over Bitburg, the Rwandan genocide, and the bombing of Kosovo. Drawing upon extensive research on politics, popular culture, student protests, religious debates and various strains of Zionist ideologies, Lipstadt traces how the Holocaust became integral to the fabric of American life. Even popular culture, including such films as Dr. Strangelove and such books as John Hershey’s The Wall, was influenced by and in turn influenced thinking about the Holocaust. Equally important, the book shows how Americans used the Holocaust to make sense of what was happening in the United States. Many Americans saw the civil rights movement in light of Nazi oppression, for example, while others feared that American soldiers in Vietnam were destroying a people identified by the government as the enemy. Lipstadt demonstrates that the Holocaust became not just a tragedy to be understood but also a tool for interpreting America and its place in the world. Ultimately Holocaust: An American Understanding tells us as much about America in the years since the end of World War II as it does about the Holocaust itself.

Holocaust Angst

Holocaust Angst
Author: Jacob S. Eder
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9780190237844
Available:
Release: 2016-07-01
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Resume:

In the face of an outpouring of research on Holocaust history, Holocaust Angst takes an innovative approach. It explores how Germans perceived and reacted to how Americans publicly commemorated the Holocaust. It argues that a network of mostly conservative West German officials and their associates in private organizations and foundations, with Chancellor Kohl located at its center, perceived themselves as the "victims" of the afterlife of the Holocaust in America. They were concerned that public manifestations of Holocaust memory, such as museums, monuments, and movies, could severely damage the Federal Republic's reputation and even cause Americans to question the Federal Republic's status as an ally. From their perspective, American Holocaust memorial culture constituted a stumbling block for (West) German-American relations since the late 1970s. Providing the first comprehensive, archival study of German efforts to cope with the Nazi past vis-à-vis the United States up to the 1990s, this book uncovers the fears of German officials-some of whom were former Nazis or World War II veterans-about the impact of Holocaust memory on the reputation of the Federal Republic and reveals their at times negative perceptions of American Jews. Focusing on a variety of fields of interaction, ranging from the diplomatic to the scholarly and public spheres, the book unearths the complicated and often contradictory process of managing the legacies of genocide on an international stage. West German decision makers realized that American Holocaust memory was not an "anti-German plot" by American Jews and acknowledged that they could not significantly change American Holocaust discourse. In the end, German confrontation with American Holocaust memory contributed to a more open engagement on the part of the West German government with this memory and eventually rendered it a "positive resource" for German self-representation abroad. Holocaust Angst offers new perspectives on postwar Germany's place in the world system as well as the Holocaust culture in the United States and the role of transnational organizations.

Learning from the Germans

Learning from the Germans
Author: Susan Neiman
Pages: 432
ISBN: 9780374715526
Available:
Release: 2019-08-27
Editor: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Language: en

Resume:

As an increasingly polarized America fights over the legacy of racism, Susan Neiman, author of the contemporary philosophical classic Evil in Modern Thought, asks what we can learn from the Germans about confronting the evils of the past In the wake of white nationalist attacks, the ongoing debate over reparations, and the controversy surrounding Confederate monuments and the contested memories they evoke, Susan Neiman’s Learning from the Germans delivers an urgently needed perspective on how a country can come to terms with its historical wrongdoings. Neiman is a white woman who came of age in the civil rights–era South and a Jewish woman who has spent much of her adult life in Berlin. Working from this unique perspective, she combines philosophical reflection, personal stories, and interviews with both Americans and Germans who are grappling with the evils of their own national histories. Through discussions with Germans, including Jan Philipp Reemtsma, who created the breakthrough Crimes of the Wehrmacht exhibit, and Friedrich Schorlemmer, the East German dissident preacher, Neiman tells the story of the long and difficult path Germans faced in their effort to atone for the crimes of the Holocaust. In the United States, she interviews James Meredith about his battle for equality in Mississippi and Bryan Stevenson about his monument to the victims of lynching, as well as lesser-known social justice activists in the South, to provide a compelling picture of the work contemporary Americans are doing to confront our violent history. In clear and gripping prose, Neiman urges us to consider the nuanced forms that evil can assume, so that we can recognize and avoid them in the future.

American Indian Holocaust and Survival

American Indian Holocaust and Survival
Author: Russell Thornton
Pages: 292
ISBN: 080612220X
Available:
Release: 1987
Editor: University of Oklahoma Press
Language: en

Resume:

Demographic overview of North American history describing in detail the holocaust that occurred to the Indians.

Identity Politics in the Age of Genocide

Identity Politics in the Age of Genocide
Author: David B. MacDonald
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781134085729
Available:
Release: 2007-09-28
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Resume:

In an era of globalization and identity politics, this book explores how Holocaust imagery and vocabulary have been appropriated and applied to other genocides. The author examines how the Holocaust has impacted on other ethnic and social groups, asking whether the Holocaust as a symbol is a useful or destructive means of reading non-Jewish history. This volume: explains the rise of the Holocaust as a gradual process, charting how its importance as a symbol has evolved, providing a theoretical framework to understand how and why non-Jewish groups choose to invoke ‘holocausts’ to apply to other events explores the Holocaust in relation to colonialism and indigenous genocide, with case studies on America, Australia and New Zealand analyzes the Holocaust in relation to war and genocide, with case studies on the Armenian genocide, the Rape of Nanking, Serbia and the Rwandan genocide examines how the Holocaust has been used to promote animal rights. Demonstrating both the opportunities and pitfalls the Holocaust provides to non-Jewish groups who seek to represent their collective histories, this book fills a much needed gap on the use of the Holocaust in contemporary identity politics and will be of interest to students and researchers of politics, the Holocaust and genocide.

The Holocaust in American Film

The Holocaust in American Film
Author: Judith E. Doneson
Pages: 302
ISBN: 0815629265
Available:
Release: 2002-01-01
Editor: Syracuse University Press
Language: en

Resume:

This work offers insights into how specific films influenced the Americanization of the Holocaust and how the medium per se helped seed that event into the public consciousness. In addition to an in-depth study on films produced for both theatrical release and TV since 1937 - including The Great Dictator, Cabaret, Julia, and the mini-series Holocaust - this work provides an analysis of Schindler's List and the debate over the merit of Spielberg's vision of the Holocaust. It also examines more thoroughly made-for-television movies, such as Escape From Sobibor, Playing For Time, and War and Remembrance. A special chapter on The Diary of Anne Frank discusses the evolution of that singularly European work into a universal symbol. Paying special attention to the tumultuous 1960s in America, it assesses the effect of the era on Holocaust films made during that time. It also discusses how these films helped integrate the Holocaust into the fabric of American society, transforming it into a metaphor for modern suffering. Finally, the work explores cinema in relation to the Americanization of the Jewish image.

While America Watches

While America Watches
Author: Jeffrey Shandler
Pages: 340
ISBN: 9780199881475
Available:
Release: 2000-09-21
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Resume:

The Holocaust holds a unique place in American public culture, and, as Jeffrey Shandler argues in While America Watches, it is television, more than any other medium, that has brought the Holocaust into our homes, our hearts, and our minds. Much has been written about Holocaust film and literature, and yet the medium that brings the subject to most people--television--has been largely neglected. Now Shandler provides the first account of how television has familiarized the American people with the Holocaust. He starts with wartime newsreels of liberated concentration camps, showing how they set the moral tone for viewing scenes of genocide, and then moves to television to explain how the Holocaust and the Holocaust survivor have gained stature as moral symbols in American culture. From early teleplays to coverage of the Eichmann trial and the Holocaust miniseries, as well as documentaries, popular series such as All in the Family and Star Trek, and news reports of recent interethnic violence in Bosnia, Shandler offers an enlightening tour of television history. Shandler also examines the many controversies that televised presentations of the Holocaust have sparked, demonstrating how their impact extends well beyond the broadcasts themselves. While America Watches is sure to continue this discussion--and possibly the controversies--among many readers.

The Indian Dream

The Indian Dream
Author: Samuelin MarTinez
Pages: 230
ISBN: 9781481761932
Available:
Release: 2013-06-18
Editor: Author House
Language: en

Resume:

How does a mother and son heal from the most horrid human experience, an American Holocaust that everyone is convinced never existed. My mother faced the greatest fears of having to surrender her son to an American campaign to "Kill the Indian save the child" under the threat of America taking me from her if she did not send me to school. This is the story of how difficult it was for America to kill the Indian in me and how my mother maintained our traditional relations to healing our broken spirits. This is a story of how I recovered from the traumas inflicted in me since I was five years old and how I joined a national effort to share our healing with others. Working for thirty eight years as a Psychiatric Social Worker in one of the first Crisis Emergency Response Clinics serving Raza Survivors of the holocaust, and how I became a 'Social Justice Healer developing a diagnostic criteria for what our people suffer as Survivors. This book is full of examples of healing the Dislocados, the uprooted and disconnected suffering from layers of loss. I describe in detail a healing practice for all the trauma caused by a history of cruel and unusual punishment. I call the healing approach Traditional Healing Praxis and provide case examples of the healing power that emerged from forty thousand years of native self reliance. This is a story of how we survived the continuation of Corporate America's "Indian Wars." A story of how we never surrendered our native love Huatacame and continued to shelter, feed, clothe, teach, triage-doctor and protect our children. www.americanholocausthealing.com

Poland and the Holocaust in the Polish American Press 1926 1945

Poland and the Holocaust in the Polish American Press  1926 1945
Author: Magdalena Kubow
Pages: 221
ISBN: 9781476670522
Available:
Release: 2020-07-17
Editor: McFarland
Language: en

Resume:

Contrary to the common notion that news regarding the genocide was unavailable or unreliable, news from Europe was often communicated to North American Poles through the Polish-language press. This work engages with the origins debate and demonstrates that the Polish-language press covered seminal issues during the inter-war years, the war, and the Holocaust extensively on their front and main story pages, and were extremely responsive, professional, and vocal in their journalism. From Polish-Jewish relations, to the cause of the Second World War and subsequently the development of genocide-related policy, North American Poles, had a different perspective from mainstream society on the "causes and effects" of what was happening. New research for this book examines attitudes toward Jews prior to and during the Holocaust, and how information on such attitudes was disseminated. It utilizes original research from selected Polish newspapers, predominantly the Republika-Gornik, as well as survivor testimony from 1926-1945.

America American Jews and the Holocaust

America  American Jews  and the Holocaust
Author: Jeffrey Gurock
Pages: 467
ISBN: 9781136675287
Available:
Release: 2013-12-16
Editor: Routledge
Language: en

Resume:

First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Frames of Evil

Frames of Evil
Author: Caroline Joan Picart,David A. Frank
Pages: 186
ISBN: 0809327244
Available:
Release: 2006
Editor: SIU Press
Language: en

Resume:

American filmmakers appropriate the "look" of horror in Holocaust films and often use Nazis and Holocaust imagery to explain evil in the world. In this book, the authors challenge this classic horror frame, the narrative and visual borders used to demarcate monsters and the monstrous. After examining the way in which directors and producers of the most influential American Holocaust movies default to this Gothic frame, they propose that multiple frames are needed to account for evil and genocide. Using Schindler's List, The Silence of the Lambs, and Apt Pupil as case studies, the authors provide substantive and critical analyses of these films that transcend the classic horror interpretation. For example, Schindler's List, has the appearance of a historical docudrama but actually employs the visual rhetoric and narrative devices of the Hollywood horror film. The authors argue that evil has a face: Nazism, which is configured as quintessentially innate, and supernaturally crafty. The text is augmented bythirty-six film and publicity stills, also explores the commercial exploitation of suffering in film and offers constructive ways of critically evaluating this exploitation. The authors suggest that audiences will recognize their participation in much larger narrative formulas that place a premium on monstrosity and elide the role of modernity in depriving millions of their lives and dignity, often framing the suffering of others in a manner that allows for merely "documentary" enjoyment.

Beyond Belief

Beyond Belief
Author: Deborah E. Lipstadt
Pages: 384
ISBN: 9781439105344
Available:
Release: 1993-02-08
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Language: en

Resume:

This most complete study to date of American press reactions to the Holocaust sets forth in abundant detail how the press nationwide played down or even ignored reports of Jewish persecutions over a twelve-year period.

Buried by the Times

Buried by the Times
Author: Laurel Leff
Pages: 426
ISBN: 0521812879
Available:
Release: 2005-03-21
Editor: Cambridge University Press
Language: en

Resume:

Looks at decisions made at The New York Times that resulted in the minimizing, misunderstanding, and dilution of the Holocaust in a behind-the-scenes study of how America's premier newspaper failed in its coverage of the fate of European Jews.

The Holocaust

The Holocaust
Author: Jack Fischel
Pages: 196
ISBN: 0313298793
Available:
Release: 1998
Editor: Greenwood Publishing Group
Language: en

Resume:

Provides a reference guide to the principal figures, ideology, and events during the Nazis' attempt to eliminate Jews during World War II

The United States and the Nazi Holocaust

The United States and the Nazi Holocaust
Author: Barry Trachtenberg
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9781472567208
Available:
Release: 2018-02-08
Editor: Bloomsbury Publishing
Language: en

Resume:

The United States and the Nazi Holocaust is an invaluable synthesis of United States policies and attitudes towards the Nazi persecution of European Jewry from 1933 right up to the modern day. The book, which includes 20 illustrations, weaves together a vast body of scholarly literature to bring students of the Holocaust a balanced, readable overview of this complex and often controversial topic. It demonstrates that the United States' response to the rise of Nazism, the refugee crisis it provoked, the Holocaust itself, and its aftermath were-and remain to this day-intricately linked to the ever-shifting racial, economic, and social status of American Jewry. Using a broad chronological framework, Barry Trachtenberg navigates us through the major themes and events of this period. He discusses the complicated history of the Roosevelt administration's response to the worsening situation of European Jewry in the context of the ambiguous racial status of Jews in Depression and World War II-era America. He examines the post-war decades in America, and discusses, over a series of chapters, how the Holocaust, like American Jewry itself, came to move from the margins to the very center of American awareness. The United States and the Nazi Holocaust considers the reception of Holocaust survivors, post-war trials, film, memoirs, memorials, and the growing field of Holocaust Studies. The reactions of the United States government, the general public, and the Jewish communities of America are all accounted for in this integrated, detailed survey.