Confronting Suburban Poverty in America

Confronting Suburban Poverty in America
Author: Elizabeth Kneebone,Alan Berube
Pages: 169
ISBN: 9780815723912
Available:
Release: 2013-05-20
Editor: Brookings Institution Press
Language: en

Resume:

It has been nearly a half century since President Lyndon Johnson declared war on poverty. Back in the 1960s tackling poverty "in place" meant focusing resources in the inner city and in rural areas. The suburbs were seen as home to middle- and upper-class families—affluent commuters and homeowners looking for good schools and safe communities in which to raise their kids. But today's America is a very different place. Poverty is no longer just an urban or rural problem, but increasingly a suburban one as well. In Confronting Suburban Poverty in America, Elizabeth Kneebone and Alan Berube take on the new reality of metropolitan poverty and opportunity in America. After decades in which suburbs added poor residents at a faster pace than cities, the 2000s marked a tipping point. Suburbia is now home to the largest and fastest-growing poor population in the country and more than half of the metropolitan poor. However, the antipoverty infrastructure built over the past several decades does not fit this rapidly changing geography. As Kneebone and Berube cogently demonstrate, the solution no longer fits the problem. The spread of suburban poverty has many causes, including shifts in affordable housing and jobs, population dynamics, immigration, and a struggling economy. The phenomenon raises several daunting challenges, such as the need for more (and better) transportation options, services, and financial resources. But necessity also produces opportunity—in this case, the opportunity to rethink and modernize services, structures, and procedures so that they work in more scaled, cross-cutting, and resource-efficient ways to address widespread need. This book embraces that opportunity. Kneebone and Berube paint a new picture of poverty in America as well as the best ways to combat it. Confronting Suburban Poverty in America offers a series of workable recommendations for public, private, and nonprofit leaders seeking to modernize poverty alleviation and community development strategies and connect residents with economic opportunity. The authors highlight efforts in metro areas where local leaders are learning how to do more with less and adjusting their approaches to address the metropolitan scale of poverty—for example, integrating services and service delivery, collaborating across sectors and jurisdictions, and using data-driven and flexible funding strategies. "We believe the goal of public policy must be to provide all families with access to communities, whether in cities or suburbs, that offer a high quality of life and solid platform for upward mobility over time. Understanding the new reality of poverty in metropolitan America is a critical step toward realizing that goal."—from Chapter One

Poorly Understood

Poorly Understood
Author: Mark Robert Rank,Lawrence M. Eppard,Heather E. Bullock
Pages: 376
ISBN: 9780190881405
Available:
Release: 2021-03-01
Editor: Oxford University Press
Language: en

Resume:

What if the idealized image of American societya land of opportunity that will reward hard work with economic successis completely wrong? Few topics have as many myths, stereotypes, and misperceptions surrounding them as that of poverty in America. The poor have been badly misunderstood since the beginnings of the country, with the rhetoric only ratcheting up in recent times. Our current era of fake news, alternative facts, and media partisanship has led to a breeding ground for all types of myths and misinformation to gain traction and legitimacy. Poorly Understood is the first book to systematically address and confront many of the most widespread myths pertaining to poverty. Mark Robert Rank, Lawrence M. Eppard, and Heather E. Bullock powerfully demonstrate that the realities of poverty are much different than the myths; indeed in many ways they are more disturbing. The idealized image of American society is one of abundant opportunities, with hard work being rewarded by economic prosperity. But what if this picture is wrong? What if poverty is an experience that touches the majority of Americans? What if hard work does not necessarily lead to economic well-being? What if the reasons for poverty are largely beyond the control of individuals? And if all of the evidence necessary to disprove these myths has been readily available for years, why do they remain so stubbornly pervasive? These are much more disturbing realities to consider because they call into question the very core of America's identity. Armed with the latest research, Poorly Understood not only challenges the myths of poverty and inequality, but it explains why these myths continue to exist, providing an innovative blueprint for how the nation can move forward to effectively alleviate American poverty.

Broke in America

Broke in America
Author: Joanne Samuel Goldblum,Colleen Shaddox
Pages: 320
ISBN: 9781950665631
Available:
Release: 2021-02-02
Editor: BenBella Books
Language: en

Resume:

Water. Food. Housing. The most basic and crucial needs for survival, yet 40 percent of people in the United States don't have the resources to get them. With key policy changes, we could eradicate poverty in this country within our lifetime—but we need to get started now. Nearly 40 million people in the United States live below the poverty line—about $26,200 for a family of four. Low-income families and individuals are everywhere, from cities to rural communities. While poverty is commonly seen as a personal failure, or a deficiency of character or knowledge, it's actually the result of bad policy. Public policy has purposefully erected barriers that deny access to basic needs, creating a society where people can easily become trapped—not because we lack the resources to lift them out, but because we are actively choosing not to. Poverty is close to inevitable for low-wage workers and their children, and a large percentage of these people, despite qualifying for it, do not receive government aid. From Joanne Samuel Goldblum and Colleen Shaddox, Broke in America offers an eye-opening and galvanizing look at life in poverty in this country: how circumstances and public policy conspire to keep people poor, and the concrete steps we can take to end poverty for good. In clear, accessible prose, Goldblum and Shaddox detail the ways the current system is broken and how it's failing so many of us. They also highlight outdated and ineffective policies that are causing or contributing to this unnecessary problem. Every chapter features action items readers can use to combat poverty—both nationwide and in our local communities, including the most effective public policies you can support and how to work hand-in-hand with representatives to affect change. So far, our attempted solutions have fallen short because they try to "fix" poor people rather than address the underlying problems. Fortunately, it's much easier to fix policy than people. Essential and timely, Broke in America offers a crucial road map for securing a brighter future.

The Other America

The Other America
Author: Michael Harrington
Pages: 231
ISBN: 9780684826783
Available:
Release: 1997-08
Editor: Simon and Schuster
Language: en

Resume:

Presents the original report on poverty in America that led President Kennedy to initiate the federal poverty program

Policies to Address Poverty in America

Policies to Address Poverty in America
Author: Melissa Kearney,Benjamin Harris
Pages: 196
ISBN: 9780815726470
Available:
Release: 2014-06-19
Editor: The Hamilton Project
Language: en

Resume:

One-in-seven adults and one-in-five children in the United States live in poverty. Individuals and families living in povertyÊnot only lack basic, material necessities, but they are also disproportionally afflicted by many social and economic challenges. Some of these challenges include the increased possibility of an unstable home situation, inadequate education opportunities at all levels, and a high chance of crime and victimization. Given this growing social, economic, and political concern, The Hamilton Project at Brookings asked academic experts to develop policy proposals confronting the various challenges of AmericaÕs poorest citizens, and to introduce innovative approaches to addressing poverty.ÊWhen combined, the scope and impact of these proposals has the potential to vastly improve the lives of the poor. The resulting 14 policy memos are included in The Hamilton ProjectÕs Policies to Address Poverty in America. The main areas of focus include promoting early childhood development, supporting disadvantaged youth, building worker skills, and improving safety net and work support.

Poverty in America

Poverty in America
Author: John Iceland
Pages: 206
ISBN: 9780520239593
Available:
Release: 2003-10
Editor: Univ of California Press
Language: en

Resume:

"This volume is an excellent overview of the dimensions and sources of American poverty. John Iceland combines statistical data, theoretical arguments, and historical information in a book that is highly readable and will very likely become a standard reference for students of poverty."—William Julius Wilson, author of When Work Disappears "In just a few short pages, Iceland brings anyone--lay reader, student, professional researcher--up to speed on the major issues and debates about poverty in America. With succinct and engaging prose, Poverty in America covers the gamut--from theoretical issues to measurement to history to public policy--better than any other book out there right now."—Dalton Conley, author of Honky "Must reading on a tough and important topic. With some answers that may surprise, Iceland sorts out competing theories of why people are poor in the richest country in the world. His book should motivate every reader--policy maker, researcher, citizen-- to think hard about what it means to be poor today and how our society can best reduce the hardship and poverty still with us."—Constance F. Citro, National Research Council of the National Academies, Washington, D.C.

Poorly Understood

Poorly Understood
Author: Mark Robert Rank,Lawrence M. Eppard,Heather E. Bullock
Pages: 256
ISBN: 9780190881382
Available:
Release: 2021
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
Language: en

Resume:

Work hard to get ahead; the poor are mostly minorities in inner cities living lazily off of welfare fraud; the government spends more on welfare than anywhere else in the world; America is a land of equal opportunity with easy social mobility for all. These are but a handful of the many myths about poverty in America, some of which have persisted for decades, with significant and harmful consequences on our social policy, our social compacts, and ourselves.Poorly Understood seeks to challenge and debunk these myths, along the way asking tough questions about how and why they have persisted and what it would take to replace them with true stories.

Confronting Poverty

Confronting Poverty
Author: Mark Robert Rank
Pages: 200
ISBN: 9781544358888
Available:
Release: 2020-12-16
Editor: SAGE Publications
Language: en

Resume:

Confronting Poverty is a text that introduces students to the dynamics of poverty and economic hardship in the U.S. It address four fundamental question: 1) What is the nature, prevalence, and characteristics of poverty; 2) Why does poverty exist; 3) What are the effects and consequences of poverty upon individuals and the wider society; and 4) How can poverty be reduced and alleviated? In clear and engaging writing, Confronting Poverty provides students with the most up-to-date research and thinking regarding American poverty and inequality. It includes the many insights of the author’s 30 years of writing and teaching on the subject. It is designed to be used as either a primary or secondary text in a wide range of courses across academic disciplines. In addition, Confronting Poverty makes use of an innovative companion website developed by the author. The focal point of the website is an interactive tool, called the Poverty Risk Calculator, that has been constructed with hundreds of thousands of case records extracted from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID) data set. The website also includes a discussion guide on various aspects of poverty along with many other interactive links and activities (short documentary films, video interviews and lectures, interactive data sources, research briefs, magazine and newspaper articles). Each chapter includes an on-line activity from the companion website for students to engage in, resulting in a dynamic learning experience.

2 00 a Day

 2 00 a Day
Author: Kathryn J. Edin,H. Luke Shaefer
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9780544303188
Available:
Release: 2015-09-01
Editor: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Language: en

Resume:

Thestory ofa kind of poverty in America so deep that we, as a country, don't even think exists from a leading national poverty expert who defies convention ("New York Times")"

Invisible Americans

Invisible Americans
Author: Jeff Madrick
Pages: 240
ISBN: 9781101974056
Available:
Release: 2020-12
Editor: Vintage
Language: en

Resume:

An essential, and impossible-to-ignore, examination of one of the most pressing, harmful, and heartbreaking problems facing our country: the widespread poverty among American children. By official count, more than one out of every six American children live beneath the poverty line. But statistics alone tell little of the story. In Invisible Americans, Jeff Madrick brings to light the often invisible reality and irreparable damage of child poverty in America. Keeping his focus on the children, he examines the roots of the problem, including the toothless remnants of our social welfare system, entrenched racism, and a government unmotivated to help the most voiceless citizens. Backed by new and unambiguous research, he makes clear the devastating consequences of growing up poor: living in poverty, even temporarily, is detrimental to cognitive abilities, emotional control, and the overall health of children. The cost to society is incalculable. The inaction of politicians is unacceptable. Still, Madrick argues, there may be more reason to hope now than ever before. Rather than attempting to treat the symptoms of poverty, we might be able to ameliorate its worst effects through a single, simple, and politically feasible policy that he lays out in this impassioned and urgent call to arms.

A People s History of Poverty in America

A People s History of Poverty in America
Author: Stephen Pimpare
Pages: 336
ISBN: 9781595586964
Available:
Release: 2011-06-07
Editor: The New Press
Language: en

Resume:

In this compulsively readable social history, political scientist Stephen Pimpare vividly describes poverty from the perspective of poor and welfare-reliant Americans from the big city to the rural countryside. He focuses on how the poor have created community, secured shelter, and found food and illuminates their battles for dignity and respect. Through prodigious archival research and lucid analysis, Pimpare details the ways in which charity and aid for the poor have been inseparable, more often than not, from the scorn and disapproval of those who would help them. In the rich and often surprising historical testimonies he has collected from the poor in America, Pimpare overturns any simple conclusions about how the poor see themselves or what it feels like to be poor—and he shows clearly that the poor are all too often aware that charity comes with a price. It is that price that Pimpare eloquently questions in this book, reminding us through powerful anecdotes, some heart-wrenching and some surprisingly humorous, that poverty is not simply a moral failure.

Poverty in America

Poverty in America
Author: John Iceland
Pages: 226
ISBN: 9780520956797
Available:
Release: 2013-08-01
Editor: Univ of California Press
Language: en

Resume:

The United States is among the most affluent nations in the world and has its largest economy; nevertheless, it has more poverty than most countries with similar standards of living. Growing income inequality and the Great Recession have made the problem worse. In this thoroughly revised edition of Poverty in America, Iceland takes a new look at this issue by examining why poverty remains pervasive, what it means to be poor in America today, which groups are most likely to be poor, the root causes of poverty, and the effects of policy on poverty. This new edition also includes completely updated data and extended discussions of poverty in the context of the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street movements as well as new chapters on the Great Recession and global poverty. In doing so this book provides the most recent information available on patterns and trends in poverty and engages in an open and accessible manner in current critical debates.

Poverty in America

Poverty in America
Author: Tamara Thompson
Pages: 144
ISBN: 9780737771848
Available:
Release: 2015-04-27
Editor: Greenhaven Publishing LLC
Language: en

Resume:

An estimated 43.1 million Americans live in poverty. While the government strives to have resources for citizens troubled by poverty, many Americans feel there is not enough being done. This edition explores issues related to poverty in America. Article topics include whether or not poverty is a growing problem in the United Sates, its causes, and ways to reduce poverty for Americans.

Ending Poverty in America

Ending Poverty in America
Author: John Edwards,Marion G. Crain,Vice Provost Wiley B Rutledge Professor of Law & Director Center for the Interdisciplinary Study of Work and Social Capital Marion Crain,Arne L. Kalleberg,Professor Arne L Kalleberg
Pages: 288
ISBN: UCSC:32106019142642
Available:
Release: 2007
Editor: The New Press
Language: en

Resume:

A blueprint for ending poverty in America, based on the philosophies of leading scholars, businesspeople, and activists and published in conjunction with the country's top anti-poverty centers, addresses a range of issues, from job creation and education to housing and family-friendly social policy.

The Poverty Industry

The Poverty Industry
Author: Daniel L. Hatcher
Pages: 288
ISBN: 9781479863112
Available:
Release: 2016-06-21
Editor: NYU Press
Language: en

Resume:

The shocking truth about how state governments and their private industry partners are profiting from the social programs meant to support disadvantaged Americans Government aid doesn’t always go where it’s supposed to. Foster care agencies team up with companies to take disability and survivor benefits from abused and neglected children. States and their revenue consultants use illusory schemes to siphon Medicaid funds intended for children and the poor into general state coffers. Child support payments for foster children and families on public assistance are converted into government revenue. And the poverty industry keeps expanding, leaving us with nursing homes and juvenile detention centers that sedate residents to reduce costs and maximize profit, local governments buying nursing homes to take the facilities’ federal aid while the elderly languish with poor care, and counties hiring companies to mine the poor for additional funds in modern day debtor’s prisons. In The Poverty Industry, Daniel L. Hatcher shows us how state governments and their private industry partners are profiting from the social safety net, turning America’s most vulnerable populations into sources of revenue. The poverty industry is stealing billions in federal aid and other funds from impoverished families, abused and neglected children, and the disabled and elderly poor. As policy experts across the political spectrum debate how to best structure government assistance programs, a massive siphoning of the safety net is occurring behind the scenes. In the face of these abuses of power, Hatcher offers a road map for reforms to realign the practices of human service agencies with their intended purpose and to prevent the misuse of public taxpayer dollars. With more Americans than ever before seeking unemployment benefits, it is essential to remedy the nefarious practices that will impede them from receiving the full government support they are due. The Poverty Industry shows us the path to rectify this systemic inequality to ensure that government aid truly gets to those in need.

Poverty in America

Poverty in America
Author: National Policy Committee on Pockets of Poverty
Pages: 18
ISBN: OCLC:13507357
Available:
Release: 1965
Editor: Unknown
Language: en

Resume:

Multidimensional Poverty in America

Multidimensional Poverty in America
Author: Roger White
Pages: 333
ISBN: 9783030459161
Available:
Release: 2020-12-12
Editor: Springer Nature
Language: en

Resume:

This book investigates and documents multidimensional poverty in the United States and identifies patterns and relationships that contribute to the development of a more complete understanding of the incidence and intensity of deprivation. The first part introduces multidimensional poverty and provides a rationale for viewing poverty through a lens of multiple deprivations. It discusses how the Multidimensional Poverty Index (MPI) compares to more narrowly-focused, income-based poverty measures and emphasizes its usefulness and applicability for the formulation of related, welfare-enhancing public policies. The second part documents multidimensional poverty incidence, intensity, and corresponding MPI values at the aggregate level of detail, for various demographic cohorts, and across geographic locales. The book then presents results from an empirical analysis that identifies the determinants of multidimensional poverty incidence and of individual deprivation scores. The third part consists of three studies of multidimensional poverty, examining the effect of the Affordable Care Act on multidimensional poverty incidence and intensity, variation in multidimensional poverty across native- and foreign-born residents (and across immigrants’ home countries) of the US, and variation in the respective indicators that contribute to multidimensional poverty across the life cycle. The book closes with two chapters. The first relays the findings of counterfactual exercises where certain deprivations are assumed to have been eliminated. The final chapter summarizes the work, draws inferences and arrives at conclusions, and discusses the corresponding public policy implications.

The American Way of Poverty

The American Way of Poverty
Author: Sasha Abramsky
Pages: 368
ISBN: 9781568589558
Available:
Release: 2013-09-10
Editor: Bold Type Books
Language: en

Resume:

Selected as A Notable Book of the Year by The New York Times Book Review Fifty years after Michael Harrington published his groundbreaking book The Other America, in which he chronicled the lives of people excluded from the Age of Affluence, poverty in America is back with a vengeance. It is made up of both the long-term chronically poor and new working poor—the tens of millions of victims of a broken economy and an ever more dysfunctional political system. In many ways, for the majority of Americans, financial insecurity has become the new norm. The American Way of Poverty shines a light on this travesty. Sasha Abramsky brings the effects of economic inequality out of the shadows and, ultimately, suggests ways for moving toward a fairer and more equitable social contract. Exploring everything from housing policy to wage protections and affordable higher education, Abramsky lays out a panoramic blueprint for a reinvigorated political process that, in turn, will pave the way for a renewed War on Poverty. It is, Harrington believed, a moral outrage that in a country as wealthy as America, so many people could be so poor. Written in the wake of the 2008 financial collapse, in an era of grotesque economic extremes, The American Way of Poverty brings that same powerful indignation to the topic.

Why America Lost the War on Poverty And How to Win It

Why America Lost the War on Poverty  And How to Win It
Author: Frank Stricker
Pages: 360
ISBN: 9780807882290
Available:
Release: 2011-02-01
Editor: UNC Press Books
Language: en

Resume:

In a provocative assessment of American poverty and policy from 1950 to the present, Frank Stricker examines an era that has seen serious discussion about the causes of poverty and unemployment. Analyzing the War on Poverty, theories of the culture of poverty and the underclass, the effects of Reaganomics, and the 1996 welfare reform, Stricker demonstrates that most antipoverty approaches are futile without the presence (or creation) of good jobs. Stricker notes that since the 1970s, U.S. poverty levels have remained at or above 11%, despite training programs and periods of economic growth. The creation of jobs has continued to lag behind the need for them. Stricker argues that a serious public debate is needed about the job situation; social programs must be redesigned, a national health care program must be developed, and economic inequality must be addressed. He urges all sides to be honest--if we don't want to eliminate poverty, then we should say so. But if we do want to reduce poverty significantly, he says, we must expand decent jobs and government income programs, redirecting national resources away from the rich and toward those with low incomes. Why America Lost the War on Poverty--And How to Win It is sure to prompt much-needed debate on how to move forward.

So Rich So Poor

So Rich  So Poor
Author: Peter Edelman
Pages: 205
ISBN: 9781595589576
Available:
Release: 2013-09-03
Editor: New Press, The
Language: en

Resume:

“A competent, thorough assessment from a veteran expert in the field.” —KirkusReviews Income disparities in our wealthy nation are wider than at any point since the Great Depression. The structure of today’s economy has stultified wage growth for half of America’s workers—with even worse results at the bottom and for people of color—while bestowing billions on the few at the very top. In this “accessible and inspiring analysis”, lifelong anti-poverty advocate Peter Edelman assesses how the United States can have such an outsized number of unemployed and working poor despite important policy gains. He delves into what is happening to the people behind the statistics and takes a particular look at young people of color, for whom the possibility of productive lives is too often lost on the way to adulthood (Angela Glover Blackwell). For anyone who wants to understand one of the critical issues of twenty-first century America, So Rich, So Poor is “engaging and informative” (William Julius Wilson) and “powerful and eloquent” (Wade Henderson).